Trying Out A New Lens In Regents Park

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Trying Out A New Lens In Regents Park

  • I recently purchased a Sigma 600mm lens. This morning I tried it out properly for the first time. It is too much for the garden and the College Robins, where the 400mm Canon lens rules the roost, but for more expansive locations such as Leighton Moss, it might prove useful for those pesky Marsh Harriers. It won't be much use for the woodland areas if I'm getting up close and personal with the Robin population, so the 400 will be king there too. It's a very lightweight lens and that helps. Tony Duckett was with me and said it was not much heavier than the 400mm lens he was using on his Nikon, albeit his lens is probably three times the price! The weather changed from rain to blue skies and back again within a few minutes (thank you Brian) but I did have an opportunity to get  off a few shots. I missed the male Kestrel (sorry Wendy) but he's not going anywhere, so I'll have further opportunities in the future. Here are the first few pics with the new lens. It will take some getting used to, but will have its uses in the right location.

    Distant Robin, heavily cropped

    Cyril burying his treasure map (directions to Knutsford)

    First attempt at a BIF shot

    Hoping no messages are on their way down!

    At least it's brown bread

    As Mr Duckett noted "Do they ever stop breeding?"

    Only five, so I suspect that the others would have been predated

    Crow trying to get his morning coffee

  • Well you certainly have had a great day out with the new lens. Lovely photos and you have captured all very nicely. Very nice first one with the foliage, and the Cyril is getting everything hidden for when he has to go and stay with Auntie Hazel, boootiful little ducklings. Crow and morning coffee?

  • Very nice indeed Paul, well done on your first real test with this new lens;  will be handy for those more distant birds and in flight shots.  

  • Great shots Paul,looking forward to more as you get into the swing.

  • Catlady

     Crow and morning coffee?

    The Crow was trying to get the lid off a discarded coffee container (next to its foot).

  • Doh!! I thought that was one of those sensor lights you have in the garden! Now I ask you why would there be one lying in the middle of a field? 

  • Any open space + humans = litter

  • Lol, I meant the light!

  • I got the Sigma 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Contemporary about two weeks ago could be a little longer forgot about the week in hospital and I am find it quite good that Robin of mine you cropped to show me the tail feather was taken with it, the settings are below, if I’d have had it on the 5DMk 4 I would have taken the ISO up to 2000 knowing it can handle noise better then the 7D Mk II but for 1/200sec hand held its not bad and its not a crop Paul.

    Canon EOS 7D Mark II
    Focal Length 600.0mm
    1/200sec
    f/6.3
    ISO 800

    Jim

  • I'm using a 600D, so a couple of steps down the food chain. I just shoot on auto (lens and camera). Too much time spent looking at the camera means less time watching the Robins lol

  • That's true Paul :)

    Jim

  • monkeycheese

    I'm using a 600D, so a couple of steps down the food chain. I just shoot on auto (lens and camera). Too much time spent looking at the camera means less time watching the Robins lol

    NIce set and congrats on the new lens. Cn I suggest moving on to Shutter Priority or Aperture Prority rather than Auto. It doesn't mean a lot of time looking at the camera but it does put you more in control as you can change the settings to get the results you want more easily - all the info is provivided in your viewfinder and you just have to move a thumbwheel or two :). Auto will let you down more I believe, especially when it comes to movement .

  • Bobs_Still_Retired

    monkeycheese

    I'm using a 600D, so a couple of steps down the food chain. I just shoot on auto (lens and camera). Too much time spent looking at the camera means less time watching the Robins lol

    NIce set and congrats on the new lens. Cn I suggest moving on to Shutter Priority or Aperture Prority rather than Auto. It doesn't mean a lot of time looking at the camera but it does put you more in control as you can change the settings to get the results you want more easily - all the info is provivided in your viewfinder and you just have to move a thumbwheel or two :). Auto will let you down more I believe, especially when it comes to movement .

    I think it needs Aitch to change his settings when he's not looking on his next visit to Leighton Moss

  • Looks like the new lens is giving good results, Paul. A valuable addition to the photographic armoury for distant birds. It seem to have good reviews on WEX.

  • Clare had one when we all met up in Regents Park last month. Park Cameras were doing a special offer, so I purchased one. I'll have to try Shutter and Aperture priority settings at some point to get the best out of it (as Bob suggested), but for now I'm just getting the hang of it. I've had it for a month and hadn't used it until yesterday (apart from a pic of the Goldies in in the holly tree and the Ferals on the roof). The 400 is more versatile remains the lens of choice, especially where my Robins are concerned. No point feeding them and then retiring a huge distance to photograph them!