Talking about Bird Flu at Frampton Marsh on Countryfile this evening

Frampton Marsh

Frampton Marsh
RSPB Frampton Marsh offers the opportunity to explore the wildlife of the Wash, brought closer to you through the creation of reedbed, freshwater scrapes, and wet grassland.
Frampton Marsh

Talking about Bird Flu at Frampton Marsh on Countryfile this evening

  • Countryfile this evening was talking about the effects of bird flu on poultry this evening and how poultry can catch bird flu from wild birds and how a number of birds have died from bird flu at frampton marsh. Do you think that RSPB reserves should be closed during this outbreak of bird flu to members of the RSPB and also the general public as a precaution just as what happened in the last foot and mouth disease outbreak? I know that would be controversial and very difficult for visiting members as well as the public. I don't know what to think what is best. What do others think?

  • I'm not sure it would help an awful lot, you're just as likely to come into contact with infected birds in your back garden I imagine.  From the NHS website:-

    "Bird flu is spread through direct contact with infected birds (dead or alive), an infected bird's droppings, or secretions from their eyes or respiratory tract.

    Close and prolonged contact with an infected bird is generally required for the infection to spread to humans. For example:

    • touching infected birds that are dead or alive
    • inhaling or being in contact with dried dust from the droppings or bedding of infected birds
    • inhaling or being in contact with droplets sneezed by infected birds
    • culling, slaughtering, butchering or preparing infected poultry for cooking "

    So visiting or working in a poultry farm is clearly an issue, but most people would probably be at highest risk cleaning their bird feeders & the surrounding area I'd suggest (and even then the risk would be very small)