Tewkesbury Abbey Peregrines.

Wildlife

Wildlife
We're about more than just birds (though obviously we like them a lot).
Wildlife on the web

Tewkesbury Abbey Peregrines.

  • Although I no longer live in Gloucestershire, I have been keeping the occasional eye on the Tekesbury Abbey Peregrines blog. There have been Peregrines in the area for about 3 years now and they have been visiting the nest ledge for a couple of seasons, without any success. The male, Orange ring CR (Christpher Robin) is a young male and probably didn't really know what he was supposed to be doing. I'm pleased to report that they have 3 eggs due to hatch any day now apparently - obviously much later than most Peregrines but at least this year they have managed eggs. Unfortunately there is no live feed., but for anyone in the area the viewing should be good as the nest ledge is quite visible.

    Here is a link to the blog http://abbeyperegrines.blogspot.com/2018/06/

  • Nice one Bob thanks for posting the link, it will be interesting to see how they get on.

  • Thanks, Bob.  Have you kept up with the Peregrines at Chepstow?  We have not yet searched out any info online but very late in May we did see what looked like a recently fledged juvenile with buff, not white, breast feathers, roosting on the cliff at a spot across from the pub, much farther to the left from the nest you pointed us to a few years ago.  It later flew down to another spot on the cliff, walked into a hollow and brought out a carcass of a ringed bird, possibly pigeon but not certain about that.  After eating from that for a time, it flew off with the prey, again landing on the cliff face, finally returning with the prey to the spot where we first saw it.  No sign of any other Peregrines in the nearly an hour we were there.

  • Very sad news that first chick has perished apparently from starvation ... hope other eggs hatch with more success!

  • Gardenbirder

    Thanks, Bob.  Have you kept up with the Peregrines at Chepstow?  We have not yet searched out any info online but very late in May we did see what looked like a recently fledged juvenile with buff, not white, breast feathers, roosting on the cliff at a spot across from the pub, much farther to the left from the nest you pointed us to a few years ago.  It later flew down to another spot on the cliff, walked into a hollow and brought out a carcass of a ringed bird, possibly pigeon but not certain about that.  After eating from that for a time, it flew off with the prey, again landing on the cliff face, finally returning with the prey to the spot where we first saw it.  No sign of any other Peregrines in the nearly an hour we were there.

    No Ann I haven't though I have seen occasional pictures of them on the Forest of Dean group FB page I am also a member of. I think they are lucky and tend to be left alone, not a huge number of people know about them so they just quietly get on with raising their young. I gather that the nest site varies, sometimes opposite the pub but sometimes on the cliff below the castle walls - a much more difficult place to see from.I will make some enquiries as to where and how many.

  • WendyBartter

    Very sad news that first chick has perished apparently from starvation ... hope other eggs hatch with more success!

    Yes, its very sad but I do believe that its quite common for 1st time parents to have a (relatively) unsuccessful year and this pair are certainly late when you consider how many fledged Peregrines are appearing in pictures. The real hope is that the pair will continue to be together, use the Abbey nest site and be properly productive in the future. I think this lateness and the starvation of the first chick is a clear sign that this is their first proper breeding attempt - there were concerns over the last couple of years that the birds were actually (attempting to nest) nesting somewhere else and just using the Abbey as a roost/observation post.

  • Gardenbirder

    Thanks, Bob.  Have you kept up with the Peregrines at Chepstow?  We have not yet searched out any info online but very late in May we did see what looked like a recently fledged juvenile with buff, not white, breast feathers, roosting on the cliff at a spot across from the pub, much farther to the left from the nest you pointed us to a few years ago.  It later flew down to another spot on the cliff, walked into a hollow and brought out a carcass of a ringed bird, possibly pigeon but not certain about that.  After eating from that for a time, it flew off with the prey, again landing on the cliff face, finally returning with the prey to the spot where we first saw it.  No sign of any other Peregrines in the nearly an hour we were there.

    Ann - Update from the Forest as promised. They didn't breed there this year and one of last years young is still hanging about - I believe late May is a bit early for a fledgling this year and also I think it takes quite a while for a Peregrine to gain adult plumage. I didn't find out whether both adults were still in the area but maybe there has been a split or they moved further off because I would have thought that the youngster would not have been tolerated for this long. 

  • Many thanks for the info Bob ... hadn't even had time to acknowledge your post before the tragic event!

  • Bob, Very sad about the Tewkesbury chick and interesting to hear that first time breeders can have such trouble.  Makes you wonder about the distribution of brain cells in a Peregrine--perhaps having so many devoted to flying and diving at speed and fewer for parental instincts resulting in them being slow learners regarding chicks!

    Thanks for looking for information on the Forest of Dean area Peregrines.  We were puzzled about the Peregrine we saw since it seemed too early in the year to be a fledged youngster from this year and there was no sign of any parents.  And we did wonder how long it takes to develop adult plumage.  Also the bird was flying very competently and dealing easily with the prey, which seemed odd if this was a newly fledged juvenile.

  • Wonderful news tweet saying second chick hatched & being feed &  third one imminent!  They think that female accidentally stood on first one!

  • Looks like the third egg will not hatch but the remaining chick is being fed and growing well. Fingers crossed this is a new dynasty in the making and there will be many more successful years of breeding - in a way its just a shame I left Gloucestershire as this was almost as i would have had two urban Peregrine families within a 10 minute drive :).

  • Thanks Bob for update, hopefully this chick will grow fast & furiously fit!

  • Good to hear the chick is doing well Bob, I always think it's best to just have one successful youngster if they are inexperienced rather than have 3 fail.