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Tuesday, 7 August 2018

Seabird Ecology Group, University of Liverpool - Free lecture by Cleo Small
cleo liverpool university

Seabird Ecology Group, University of Liverpool - Free lecture by Cleo Small

Dear RSPB Liverpool


I'm part of the organising group for the 14th International Seabird Group Conference in Liverpool this September.


Cleo
As part of the conference we are opening up the first plenary by Cleo Small from the RSPB & Birdlife International to non-delegates, which I'm wondering whether members of the RSPB Liverpool group would be interested in. The talk will focus on global conservation of seabirds, including success stories and solutions for future conservation of the world's seabirds. Tickets are free, and available to book online via the conference website.

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/global-seabird-conservation-hoisting-the-mast-for-hope-on-a-stormy-sea-tickets-48334977218





Global seabird conservation: hoisting the mast for hope on a stormy sea
Cleo Small, RSPB & Birdlife International

Most seabird populations and species are declining, many to globally threatened levels. At sea, commercial fisheries and pollution are taking their toll; on land, alien invasive predators and habitat disturbance and destruction are impacting many colonies. Climate change may cause (or exacerbate) problems in both domains. However, the last two decades have also seen notable successes in eradicating alien predators (mainly on uninhabited islands) and in finding solutions to seabird bycatch in longline and trawl fisheries. I will present the view from BirdLife International on whether we have reasons to be optimistic for the future of the world's seabirds, by reviewing some current and prospective global initiatives, including the development of new research and monitoring techniques, as well as pioneering collaborations involving governments, non-governmental organisations, scientists and civil society.



I would be grateful if you could pass this on to any members that may be interested in attending!



Thanks very much

Alice Trevail

PhD student in the Seabird Ecology Group of the University of Liverpool