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No Place Like Home for the Glaslyn Ospreys : Ospreys Return To Glaslyn For Their Seventh Year

Last modified: 23 March 2010

Glaslyn 2006 osprey chick

Image: The RSPB

Returning every year since 2004 the Glaslyn ospreys are back at the nest in the beautiful Glaslyn valley near Pont Croesor in Porthmadog.

 On Monday 22 March at 2.40pm the male osprey was spotted in an adjacent field to the nest site eating a large fish, and the female osprey was spotted this morning at 7am.

 Ceri Thomas, People Engagement Officer at the project said: “The ospreys spend every winter in West Africa and travel thousands of miles to return to Glaslyn every year to breed and raise their chicks.”

 She adds: “Despite the long journey, they have both arrived on virtually the same date as previous years. We opened the viewing site yesterday to visitors and all the staff and volunteers are really excited and looking forward to another wonderful season.”

 The chicks from 2009 - named Glaslyn, Glesni and Gwenlli by children from Rhosgadfan Primary School - will stay in Africa for the next few years, perfecting their amazing fishing skills.

 Life can be tricky for a young osprey, especially with the long journeys they have to make. Ringing the birds helps us to monitor their progress on these long journeys, and we now know that one of the chicks from 2006 has now started his own family in Scotland!

 The site has a live video link from the nest feeding into a TV screen in the visitor centre. This allows visitors to see flap-by-flap footage of the osprey family and can be viewed online via the following link http://www.bbc.co.uk/wales/northwest/sites/webcams/pages/ospreys.shtml

 The viewing scheme is open to the public every day from 10 am until 6 pm until the end of August and is free of charge to all. Details can also be found on the RSPB website at www.rspb.org.uk/datewithnature and there will be regular updates about the birds on the Glaslyn osprey blog at http://blogs.rspb.org.uk/glaslynospreys as well as on Twitter and Facebook.

 

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