Osprey Chat Thread for July 2018

Loch Garten ospreys

Loch Garten ospreys
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Loch Garten ospreys

Osprey Chat Thread for July 2018

  • Continued from   here

  • It is hard to believe that before the end of July some of the female ospreys will be heading south. It all goes so quickly.

    So what sort of year has  it been for you. 

    The highlight for me has been the three Dyfi males that were found to be alive and well. 

  • Last year was the first year of 5 for the Poole Harbour relocation programme.

    A Rutland female CJ7 stayed with the released chicks for several days last summer. She returned to Poole harbour this year and has stayed all summer.

    There has also been another bird, unringed, seen often.

    Here's hoping next year may see something happen on the nesting front and the first of the released young birds will hopefully return.

  • Richard B

    Last year was the first year of 5 for the Poole Harbour relocation programme.

    A Rutland female CJ7 stayed with the released chicks for several days last summer. She returned to Poole harbour this year and has stayed all summer.

    There has also been another bird, unringed, seen often.

    Here's hoping next year may see something happen on the nesting front and the first of the released young birds will hopefully return.

    Something similar has been seen at the other translocation projects. The appearance of juvenile ospreys seems to make adults think that it is a good area for nesting. 

    It would certainly be a great turnup for the book if there was a nest at Poole next year. 

  • With 14 chicks due down in 9 days time and their release corresponding to the Adult migration, it's not beyond the realms of probability that up to 20 Ospreys will be flying around the Harbour in late August. That could be a stunning display.

  • I have pictures of an Osprey on our local reservoir at this link which has a Blue ring with white letters/numbers on its left leg. Reading up the leg the ring number is EE, reading down the leg the number is 33.  However the confusion is caused by the fact that the characters have the curves of a 3 rather than the hard edges of an E.  It would really help if we knew what an E actually looked like on one of these rings. Has anyone ever taken a picture of a Blue Ring with a white E on it?

  • Here's a photo of Blue 33, the male at Manton Bay

    © John Wright

  • This is an E on a Darvic ring (EJ at Loch Garten)

    © Loch Garten

  • Bob, I've had another look and agree with you and Alan, it very much looks like a Scottish 33 bird with the ring mounted wrongly, up-side-down.  I trust you will eventually hear from Roy Dennis or his right-hand man, Tim Mackrill (sp?), but they are fairly busy at the moment, working out which birds they are going to translocate to Poole Harbour and collecting them.  They need to take them off the nests before any of the chicks on each nest can fly.

  • There is a Scottish male - Blue EE, ringed 2010 at Tain.

  • This does look a bit like EE in this photo

  • Very interesting pictures. 

  • Richard B

    This does look a bit like EE in this photo

    That's why I would like to see the font of an E on a ring. The odds are certainly on it being EE, I have no problem with that, it just would be nice to see an "E". 

  • There is the problem of what a male osprey hatched in Tain is doing down in England. 

  • Richard B

    This is an E on a Darvic ring (EJ at Loch Garten)

    © Loch Garten

    Thanks Richard, that seems to confirm that if you have 2 "E" then you also have 2 "3" at a distance. So assuming this bird was ringed correctly, reading up the leg then I would say that this is EE.  Rather intersting that its not as young as I would have thought. Big trouble is we get a lot of Osprey visits but they are usually all distant and difficult to read the ring numbers. We had Y1 from Kielder in may and recently people have seen blue FR1. It would be nice to think that this one might be considering living here.