Trip reports

Corton Waste Water Treatment Works Perimeter August 8 2015

Corton Waste Water Treatment Works Perimeter August 8 2015
Pat Chilvers

Saturday, 8 August 2015

We knew we would not see many birds as it a quiet time of year and the sewage treatment plant is under an enormous cover that makes it look like a space ship so birds are unable to access it. The new structure was built in 2000 - 2002 to replace the old sewage system, the local people had objected to it and to overcome these objections was designed with a cover over it and a small nature reserve around it.
We started our walk from Corton church car park and Edwina drew our attention to a beautiful walnut tree in the churchyard. Along the road that led to the path that went round the reserve we saw a kestrel, blackbird, magpies and crows and along the hedgerow were a lot of gatekeeper and speckled wood butterflies.
Walking through the gate to the footpath we saw a lot more gatekeepers and one of the ladies spotted a silver y moth that Edwina identified for us. We saw a lot of very interesting looking funnel shaped webs with spiders patiently waiting at the bottom for their next meal to arrive. Kestrel, jay, robin, chaffinch, dunnock, robin and green woodpecker were seen along this path too. The end of the footpath overlooked a field with a wood at the side of it and looking towards the wood we could see lots of dragonflies in the air.
After walking through the gate to the reserve we were greeted with the lovely sight of a good variety of wild flowers including hardhead, (which are a gorgeous purple colour) ladies bedstraw (which is a delicate yellow) birds foot trefoil, (which are a lovely mixture of red, yellow and orange) yarrow, (which is white) teasels, purple vetch, and many other wild plants. A large variety of native trees were planted in the now 12 year old nature reserve including, guelder rose, hawthorn, field maple, spindle, oak and ash which unfortunately have succumbed to the ash dieback disease. The rest are looking very healthy and are home to many birds and insects.
We made our way to the pond area where we saw damselflies and dragonflies; a small green damselfly that was obviously freshly emerged was of particular interest, Edwina photographed it and hopefully will be able to identify it.
Walking further on Edwina pointed out the area where a large number of bee orchids can be seen if you go at the right time of year, we were able to see the remaining seed heads. Other plants we saw along the rest of the way were wild radish, fleabane and a late flowering blue alkanet.
It had been a very pleasant walk of only 1.3 miles with very good weather. I hope everyone enjoyed it as much as I did.
Pat Chilvers